Welcome to my Blog!

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Illustration by Kim Fleming.

Aloha and welcome! Here you will find my musings on various topics such as:

  • children’s literature
  • what it’s like to be an author
  • inspirational quotes and thoughts
  • my latest projects
  • the publishing industry
  • educational resources for parents and teachers
  • parenting tips
  • arts and crafts for kiddies  and much, much more!

Stay tuned everybody! Subscribe to the LL newsletter HERE.

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Multicultural Children’s Book

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Hello all!

Today is Multicultural Children’s Book Day. I feel honoured to participate, and review a book from a talented Greek author, especially since I myself am Greek! And it fosters diversity, which is crucial.

Here goes:

Review of The Wounded Swallow  By Vaggelio Kondaki-Karametou

I had the pleasure of reading this short children’s book and I was immediately drawn in. It started off in a very sweet yet mysterious way that left me wanting to know more. I could feel the love between the mother and her daughter in the opening sequence and I was curious about the swallow they kept mentioning.

Then the story traveled to another place and time, morphing into a story narrated by the mother. It was unusual and gripping. The act of war was personified, which I found to be very original. Read the rest of this entry »

Hilarious Things Kids Say

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It’s no secret, kids have NO filter.

Like it or not, they say what’s on their mind. Throughout my years visiting elementary schools to give workshops, they’ve said many hilarious (and sometimes verging on offensive if you have no sense of humor) things to me.

Here are the 5 funniest questions my students have asked me this year:

  1. “So, as an author, do you make as much money as you would working at McDonald’s?”

It’s fascinating to see how students perceive authors! They know the J.K. Rowlings of the world make millions, but they also know this is not the norm. I was trying to explain the varying wages authors make but the thing is, we spend many days slaving away at the computer and don’t see a penny. Read the rest of this entry »

How to Find Time to Write

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I’m a writer.

You’d think I spend most of my time writing, right?

A writer is chained to her/his computer, madly tapping away at the keys, forgetting about eating and showering, right?

Uh, no.

If you’re an aspiring or professional writer, you’ll know that’s not true. First off, daily household chores take over, and some of us writers also have second jobs. This takes up a large chunk of time. But when we finally do get to work on our craft, we find ourselves having to wear so many other hats.

Read the rest of this entry »

What Does it Take to Publish a Book- Part 2

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Following my last post about what it takes to publish a book, here’s a real life example:

In 2014, I had a great idea for a book. It was about a Rabbit who is afraid of everything and then comes face to face with a gigantic bear. So I started writing it. A month in, I realized I didn’t know how to end the story. SoI decided to put the book away for a while.

I circled back to it a few months later and managed to finish it. Then I spent a few months editing it (though I don’t love the editing process!). I also sent it to a few of my critique partners to get their honest opinions. In total, I spent 11 months writing and editing the book.

When I finally had a polished version, I started to query editors. To my dismay, it was one rejection letter after the next.
After a while, I decided to give up seeking out editors and instead focus on finding an agent.

After spending months crafting the perfect query letter and researching every agent and their areas of specialty, I went to work. I queried agent after agent, with a different book. And then…again…it was a few years of more rejection letters.
But I knew it was part of the process and I never gave up.

In 2016, I finally got an agent! I was ecstatic! She started submitting my books to publishers. But my excitement was a bit deflated by the rejection letters that came in one after the other.

But, I kept believing.

Unfortunately, things were not going that well with that agent. I began to have my doubts. But I was too afraid to make a big move, for fear of once again being agentless and feeling “lost at sea.”

In 2017, I decided to take the plunge. I let the agent go. I was upset for a few weeks and felt lost, but then I picked myself up and went back to the drawing board. Read the rest of this entry »

So What Does it Take to Publish a Book?

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First, let me say:

There is no simple ‘recipe’ for success.

Many people ask me, what does it take to publish a book? While I certainly don’t know all the answers, I’ve been at this for many years. And what I’ve learned can be summed up in 5 major points:

  1. You Need a Fantastic Idea!

If you want attention from not only your readers but also the literary community, the first thing you need is a tremendous idea. But BEFORE you actually write the book, you need to research other books out there that may be similar. I’ve had several ideas I was convinced were potential best-sellers, but then, oh no, I found an almost identical book already on the market. Ideas are funny that way. Sometimes they float in the air and are public property.

  1. Be Ruthless With your Edits

Ok, so you’ve got this amazingly awesome idea. And, nobody has written anything similar. You’re off to a promising start! But a great idea is just that: a great idea. To make it come alive in a book in just the right way takes talent and a lot of practice. Your idea needs engaging characters. It needs a setting, and an ending but most of all, it needs conflict, plot and the right pacing. Once you hammer out the first draft, get back to the drawing board as many times as it takes to edit it thoroughly. Get critique partners. Be ruthless.

  1. Do Your Research!

It’s hard enough to achieve numbers 1 and 2 successfully. But if you do, the nest step is to do the proper research. Don’t just send it off to a batch of 50 random publishers. Many might not even accept that specific genre, or may not match with your writing style. It’s critical that you research the publishers that interest you to find the right matches. So when you do send your queries, it’s to editors who might actually have an interest in your work. Be smart about this step. And yes, this takes A LOT of time. There are no short-cuts. Don’t forget to keep immaculate records for future use. Read the rest of this entry »

How I Got an Agent, Lost that Agent, and Found a New One (Without Losing my Mind)

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(This post originally appeared on the WriteForKids Blog)
https://writeforkids.org/blog/2018/06/got-agent-lost-agent-found-new-one-without-losing-mind/

Like many of you, I’ve been knee deep in the querying trenches, desperately trying to make my submission stand out in the staggering slush pile. And as we all know, this process is time consuming. It goes on and on, peppered with rejection letters, until we finally get a bite.

I signed with my first agent a few weeks after I got my first bite. In my mind, my problems were now over. Yahoo! No more submissions! No more Twitter pitch parties! No more querying! I was already visualizing a book contract with the Big Five.

But that’s not how the cookie crumbled.

Here are 3 truths nobody tells you about landing an agent:

  1. It can be anti-climactic: Don’t expect a book deal the next day, week or month.
  2. You will still need patience: The submission process is laborious, no matter who’s doing the submitting.
  3. You will still get rejected: The difference is that now, the rejections get sent to your agent.

Read the rest of this entry »

Where Young Authors can Submit their Work

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I work with children giving writing and literacy workshops, and I love to encourage their own writing process. Many students are interested in getting their work published or entering competitions, so I compiled a list of useful resources. Good luck to all you aspiring writers!!

Magazines & Online

Stone Soup is a creative magazine for children written and illustrated by children, aged 8-13.
http://www.stonesoup.com/

Skipping Stones is a multicultural children’s magazine that encourages children aged 7-17 to submit their writing.
www.skippingstones.org

Amazing Children eZine – young writers ages 5-17 may submit poetry, stories, book reviews, movie reviews, music reviews, essays, articles, etc.
www.amazing-children.org/

Bazoof! Accepts youth submissions, comics, puzzles, games, crafts, jokes, sports, girl stuff, pet fun, movie previews, stories, recipes, interviews, true stories, posters & more for ages 8-12.
www.bazoofmag.com

Read the rest of this entry »