Fiction

A BEARY fun Children’s Book Launch!

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Hello world!

We all know how slow the publishing industry can be, and how difficult it is to get published. So when that dream actually comes true, it’s time to celebrate!

My new picture book NO BEARS ALLOWED was published on July 1 this past summer, but it’s been a long, winding journey to get there. The initial idea came to me in 2012, and I wrote the book a year after that. A few agents and a slew of rejection letters later, Blue Whale Press acquired the book!

So now it’s time to celebrate. I’ll be hosting a fun family event, where I’ll be reading and signing my book and offering a free puppet making workshop. Plus I’ll be making delicious cupcakes!

Details are below. Hope to see some of you there!

Author Melissa Stoller on What it Takes to be Published

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Hello world!

Welcome to my book blog. For this Q & A, please welcome my friend and multi-book author Melissa Stoller. Her debut picture books SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH and READY, SET, GORILLA! were published by Clear Fork Publishing/Spork. She explains her journey below.

But first, YAY- Melissa is generously giving away a FREE copy of her book! To enter the contest, follow me on Twitter (@LydiaLukidis) and leave a comment below. (US residents only, ends Oct 18, 2019)

Can you describe the journey to publication for this book?
My debut picture books were published in 2018! First, SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH, illustrated by Sandie Sonke, and then READY, SET, GORILLA!, illustrated by Sandy Steen Bartholomew.
Callie Metler-Smith, publisher at Clear Fork Publishing/Spork, loved SCARLET and GORILLA when I first pitched them. I was so lucky that Mira Reisberg came on board as the art director/editor for both books. And when the illustrators signed on, we knew we had two #DreamTeams.

Where did you draw the book’s inspiration?
Inspiration can be found around every corner! I was inspired to write READY, SET, GORILLA! after seeing a billboard in New York City that stated, “Ready, Set, Go.” I thought that it would be cute if a mischievous gorilla said, “Ready, Set, GOrilla!” instead. And I was inspired to write SCARLET’S MAGIC PAINTBRUSH when standing in front of a Monet painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City where I live. Staring at the Monet, I wondered what it would be like to paint with a magic paintbrush. I try to find inspiration wherever I am, and I always keep my eyes and mind open for ideas.

Please share some of your writing process.
My writing process is very iterative. I like to brainstorm, work on a first draft, and then craft lots of revisions. Also, I enjoy working on several projects at the same time. When I hit a roadblock on one project, I put it aside and move to the next. And usually, when I return to the first project, I can work out the kinks and move the story along.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?
In my previous careers, including lawyer and career counselor, I always enjoyed research and writing. When my older daughter was born, I decided to try writing for children. I also worked as a freelance writer/editor at this time and published many parenting articles as well as a parent resource book about organizing a family book club. It took a long time until my first children’s book, THE ENCHANTED SNOW GLOBE COLLECTION: RETURN TO CONEY ISLAND (a time travel adventure chapter book) was finally published in 2017. I celebrated that amazing moment!

Where do you see your career headed? Do you have other WIPs or projects in the pipeline you would like to mention?
I’m so excited that I have two new books releasing in 2020: RETURN OF THE MAGIC PAINTBRUSH (illustrated by Sandie Sonke), and SADIE’S SHABBAT STORIES (illustrated by Lisa Goldberg). Both are releasing from Clear Fork Publishing. These stories are so close to my heart. I can’t wait to see the final versions of the artwork – both illustrators are bringing extra magic to the process.

Please share your favourite kidlit books that have inspired you and served as mentor texts. Pick one classic and one contemporary book. What is it about them that moved you?
I always love anything written by Judy Blume! And one of my favorite picture books now is Bunny’s Book Club by Annie Silvestro. I love the heart and unique voice. Plus, it’s about a book club. My own adult book club just celebrated 20 years together, and we’re still going strong!

What is the best (one) piece of advice you would give to other writers?
One piece of advice I can offer to other writers is: “Write from your heart. There are children out there just waiting to read your stories. Keep creating!”

And a bonus Q- If you could be any flavour of ice cream, which one would you be and why?
Oh that’s a fun question! I’m actually a huge frozen yogurt fan and my favorite flavor from Pinkberry is pomegranate/original swirl with blueberries on top! It’s such a sweet treat!

BIO
Melissa Stoller is the author of the chapter book series The Enchanted Snow Globe Collection – Book One: Return to Coney Island and Book Two: The Liberty Bell Train Ride (Clear Fork Publishing, 2017 and 2020); and the picture books Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush and Ready, Set, GOrilla! (Clear Fork, 2018). Upcoming picture books include Return of the Magic Paintbrush and Sadie’s Shabbat Stories. She is also the co-author of The Parent-Child Book Club: Connecting With Your Kids Through Reading (HorizonLine Publishing, 2009). Melissa is an Assistant and Blogger for the Children’s Book Academy, a Regional Ambassador for The Chapter Book Challenge, a Moderator for The Debut Picture Book Study Group, and a volunteer with the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators/MetroNY. Melissa has worked as a lawyer, legal writing instructor, freelance writer and editor, and early childhood educator. Additionally, she is a member of the Board of Trustees at Temple Shaaray Tefila, and a past Trustee at The Hewitt School. Melissa lives in New York City with her husband, three daughters, and one puppy.

Social Media:
www.MelissaStoller.com
www.MelissaStoller.com/blog
http://www.facebook.com/MelissaStoller
http://www.twitter.com/melissastoller
http://www.instagram.com/Melissa_Stoller
http://www.pinterest.com/melissa_stoller

Author Cecily Cline Walton on Diversity and Kidlit

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Hello world!

Welcome to my book blog. For this Q & A, please welcome the talented author-illustrator Cecily Cline Walton who wrote the picture book The Beauty of My Skin published by 13th and Joan Publishing. She explains her journey below.

But first, Cecily is generously giving away a FREE copy of her book! To enter the contest, click HERE.

Can you describe the journey to publication for this book?
I wrote this book over 15 years ago while working as an Assistant Director of a Child Development Center in New Jersey.  Initially I submitted the manuscript to several Big Publishing Companies that had a market for Picture Books.  I was turned down by all of them so I tucked the manuscript away for a few years.

Where did you draw the book’s inspiration?
Growing up with my older sister people would always ask if we were biological siblings because are skin tones were completely different.  It was extremely annoying and hurtful that people would assume that we did not have the same parents since my sister’s skin was darker than mine.  When I became pregnant with twins I was curiously thinking which one of us would they favor the most, what would their skin look like since I am much lighter than my husband’s complexion.

Please share some of your writing process.
The words came easy to put together because it is such a short picture book.  I wanted to make sure the illustrations matched perfectly to the descriptions.  Fortunately, my illustrator Alyssa Liles-Amponsah was able to capture the beautiful tones that I imagined.  We worked together matching each painting to the correct page.  She was purposeful about making sure we showed different variations of the parents on the pages.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?
I am not sure when I realized I wanted to become a writer but I’ve always been a voracious reader and enjoyed bringing books into my classroom when I was a Pre-Kindergarten teacher.

Where do you see your career headed? Do you have other WIPs or projects in the pipeline you would like to mention?
I am planning to release another short picture book in the same format before challenging myself by going for a YA novel.  I choose to write this book because I want all child of color to see themselves represented in stories that they read at home, in school or while walking up and down the aisle of a bookstore.

Please share your favourite kidlit books that have inspired you and served as mentor texts. Pick one classic and one contemporary book. What is it about them that moved you?
My two favorite children’s books are Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by John Archmabault,  The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats and Ellington Was Not a Street by Ntozake Shange.  I love the simplicity and easy rhyme of Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.  It flows like a smooth song.  Ezra Jack Keats was a brilliant author.  The illustrations are pure and simple.  They make you want to jump in the page and play in the snow along with Peter.   I am fascinated with the book Ellington Was Not a Street because it brings to light the names of wonderful men who are so important to the frame work of the African American Community, not to mention that illustrator Kardir Nelson brings to life that time period on every page.

What is the best (one) piece of advice you would give to other writers?
My advice to any writer is just “Keep Going”.  Whether you are self-publishing or going with a traditional publisher just “Keep Pushing”.

And a bonus Q- If you could be any flavour of ice cream, which one would you be and why?
Butter Pecan – Smooth, Salty and Sweet all together

BIO
Cecily Cline Walton resides with her family between her hometown of Atlanta, Ga and Winston-Salem, NC. She loves reading books from all genres and surrounding herself with the beauty of purple tulips.  She and her three children enjoy visiting different beaches around the world, going to the movies and baking their favorite desserts.

Social Media:
**Instagram—  purpletulipscreations
**Twitter- @ClineCecily
**Facebook-  Cecily Cline Walton Children’s Book Author
Where to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Skin-Cecily-Cline-Walton/dp/1732471266

Author Beth Stilborn Interviews Me!

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Hello world!

Today, author Beth Stilborn interviewed me about my new book NO BEARS ALLOWED with illustrations by Tara J. Hannon, published by Blue Whale Press. Check out her awesome questions below:

BETH: Lydia, I know you’ve done several interviews already, and there are links to those below that I will urge my readers to check out, so I’ll try to ask new and fresh things. I’ll try, anyway! What was it about this rabbit and bear that made you take the leap of faith to strike out into new waters after doing so many work-for-hire projects?

LYDIA:  Actually, it was the other way around. My first trade picture book came out in 2014, and the second, in 2016. For these projects, I wrote narratives about a character created by the publishing house. After those experiences, I was inspired to write my own stories and wrote a slew of books. I learned about the industry and set out to publish them. I spent a few years with the wrong agents (two in total) and accumulated dozens of rejection letters for each book. At the time, making a living off my books wasn’t viable, so I also gave writing workshops in elementary schools and I turned to work-for-hire as a way to supplement my income. I have come to love both these aspects of my job and still do them today, in addition to working on my own books.

BETH: Ah. Thank you for the clarification. Can you give us a quick recap of NO BEARS ALLOWED (without revealing too much!) and tell us what your favorite part is, and why?

LYDIA: NO BEARS ALLOWED, like a lot of my work, is character driven. It’s all about Rabbit, who’s afraid of everything, including his own shadow. His biggest fear is, lo and behold, bears. And wouldn’t you know it, one day on his way to fetch carrots for his daily stew, he comes face to face with a …bear! The themes of confronting ones fears and not judging others permeate the story.

BETH: This definitely sounds like my kind of book! What sort of adjustments, if any, have you had to make to your thought processes and your book-launch processes for this book?

LYDIA: Every book and subsequent launch is a different entity, so I treat them all individually. The audience for this book is 3-6 years old, ideally, so I’ll tailor my book launch to suit them, and offer some carrot cupcakes, a free puppet making workshop and other fun elements.

BETH: Yum. Carrot cupcakes! I know you’re Canadian, as am I (waves across the miles). Has that made a difference in your process and progress as a writer?

LYDIA: Not really, though you would think it would. I don’t think most agents or publishers mind where you’re from, so long as they love your work.

BETH: That’s good news! The subject of fears and overcoming them, which is paramount in your book, is a subject that is dear to my heart. What do you hope kids will take away from your book in terms of their fears?

LYDIA: The takeaway is to learn to step out of your comfort zone. If you never try, you’ll never know who you really are or what you’re capable of. I hope this book encourages, even in a small way, children to look at their fears critically and learn to somehow overcome them. At the end of my book, Rabbit realizes that bears aren’t so bad, after all. Children may also feel like way about their own fears that have been built up in their minds.

BETH: Great message. That’s one that adults could use these days, too! This segues into the other takeaways you hope for your book, and the needs you see in our society that we as writers can help to address. I know having empathy for others is important to you. Can you talk about that? How do you weave that into your stories without being didactic or message-driven?

LYDIA: I wanted the book to cultivate empathy, since this is such a critical skill to have, especially today. It’s really about learning to see things from another person’s point of view. As Rabbit lets down his walls and allows Bear into his world, they slowly develop an unlikely friendship. Rabbit learns to become empathetic towards what he previously saw as a scary enemy. The end result is him learning to not judge others and make assumptions about them. These are lessons we could all benefit from.

Regarding not being didactic, this was a work in progress! My earlier works have been ridiculously didactic and message-fueled, and I learned through those mistakes. I came to realize that children are intelligent, and don’t need messages banged over their heads, so to speak. They much prefer an enchanting narrative, and you can weave your themes throughout that narrative.

BETH: Great point, that kids don’t need messages banged over their heads. It’s important for those of us who are writers to remember that. Books are important tools, but not in that way. That leads me to wonder what are some of the key roles of books for kids in our society, in your view? How do you hope NO BEARS ALLOWED fulfils those roles? How would you encourage other writers to work with those roles in their own books?

LYDIA: I think books are critical for many reasons. Here are a just few of them:

-books ignite one’s imagination

-books broaden one’s horizons

-books help us understand ourselves, as well as each other

-books help us find our place in this world

I hope NO BEARS ALLOWED fulfills these roles, it was certainly my intention. I think the best advice is to focus on your audience, and really understand them. What would they like to hear? And what do they need to hear about? If you keep everything child-centric, it will flow organically.

BETH: That is a perfect mini-course in what is important in writing for kids, right there. Thank you. Is there anything you’d like to add?

LYDIA: Being a writer is a wonderful journey, but it’s filled with ups and downs. I’m grateful to have found a way to build a career on telling stories and reaching children. I’m especially grateful to Steve Kemp and Alayne Christian from Blue Whale Press for seeing the magic in NO BEARS ALLOWED, and to Tara J. Hannon for agreeing to illustrate it.

BETH: And we’re grateful to Steve, Alayne, Tara, and YOU for making this book come into being. Thank you again, Lydia, for being with us today, and for your thoughtful, insightful answers.

Thanks so much, Beth!

Publisher links:

Book trailer on Alayne Kay Christian’s blog

For more information on Blue Whale Press

Links to other recent interviews:

GROG blog

Jed Doherty’s “Reading With Your Kids”

Laura Sassi’s blog

Melissa Stoller’s blog

Tara Lazar’s blog

Author-Illustrator Yevgenia Nayberg on her Artistic Process

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Hello world!

Welcome to my book blog. For this Q & A, please welcome the talented author-illustrator Yevgenia Nayberg who wrote the picture book Anya’s Secret Society published by Charlesbridge. She explains her journey below.

Can you describe the journey to publication for this book?
Anya’s Secret Society is my debut as an author. The idea came to me spontaneously and I wrote the story quickly. I spent a lot of time on the illustrations and the dummy — this is always the longest part of the process.  Once my agent submitted the project, it took about 8 months to find the publisher. This is were things really slowed down. The hardest part was to keep working on edits and not being able to get to illustrations. When the story was finally approved, it was a pure joy to illustrate! It took two years to publish Anya.

Where did you draw the book’s inspiration?
Anya’s Secret Society is based on my childhood memories. I grew up in Russia where, at the time, lefties were quite rare. It is a story about being different, but also about creativity and secret imaginary worlds.

Please share some of your writing process.
I am a visual artist, so many of my ideas come from images. I often begin with a storyboard and fill it with text and pictures as I go along. I love precision and humor both in my art and writing.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?
I am writing my fourth book right now and perhaps now is when I must admit that I want to be a writer. I’ve been writing little bits of texts for years, but never took it seriously the way I did with art. I feel like I’m finally finding my own voice as a writer.

Where do you see your career headed? Do you have other WIPs or projects in the pipeline you would like to mention?
My second book, Typewriter, is coming out in February 2020 from Creative Editions. It is a story of a Russian typewriter that immigrates to America and, once there, becomes completely useless.
I have also just begun working on a new picture book, Mona Lisa in New York, about Renaissance art, graffiti, and love in New York City. It’s coming out in September 2020 from Prestel Books.

Please share your favourite kidlit books that have inspired you and served as mentor texts. Pick one classic and one contemporary book. What is it about them that moved you?
I grew up on Russian books and at the time, we did not have a concept of a picture book the way it is understood in the US. All picture books of my childhood had A LOT of text! My mother, also a visual artist, bought many of my books because she liked illustrations, so my taste for good book art formed quite early.

What is the best (one) piece of advice you would give to other writers?
Find a story that you love- you are going to be stuck with it for a long time!

And a bonus Q- If you could be any flavour of ice cream, which one would you be and why?
I’m not a big ice cream lover, so perhaps and avocado flavor? Or bacon?

BIO

Yevgenia Nayberg is an illustrator, painter, and set and costume designer. Her illustrations have appeared in magazines and picture books, and on theatre posters, music albums, and book covers; her paintings, drawings, and illustrations are held in private collections worldwide. As a set and costume designer, she has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Endowment for the Arts/TCG Fellowship for Theatre Designers, the Independent Theatre Award and the Arlin Meyer Award. In 2018 she received a Sydney Taylor Silver Medal for her illustrations for Drop by Drop by Jaqueline Jules. Her debut author/illustrator picture book, Anya’s Secret Society, came out in March 2019. Her upcoming books, Typewriter and Mona Lisa in New York will be published in 2020.  She lives in New York City.

Social Media:
My website is www.nayberg.org
Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/znayberg
Facebook
https://facebook.com/nayberg
Anya’s Secret Society on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/anyassecretsociety/
Anya’s book trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz3MRi9o23A
Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Anyas-Secret-Society-Yevgenia-Nayberg/dp/1580898300

Q & A with Author Ashley Franklin & GIVEAWAY!

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Hello world!

Welcome to my book blog. For this Q & A, please welcome my friend and talented author Ashley Franklin who wrote the picture book NOT QUITE SNOW WHITE published by HarperCollins. She explains her journey below.

But first, she’s doing a generous GIVEAWAY! Ashley will gifting one lucky winner with her PB, for US residents only please. To enter, please click HERE.

 

Can you describe the journey to publication for this book?
My journey to publication was a bit unorthodox. I landed my first agent thanks to #PBPitch. NOT QUITE SNOW WHITE wasn’t the manuscript that piqued her interest because I hadn’t written it yet. It was after many “like it but not in love with it” rejections that I switched gears and started writing new manuscripts, one of which was NQSW. Though I’m no longer with that agent, I appreciate what she did to help find the perfect editor for the story.

Where did you draw the book’s inspiration?
Thanks to blog posts from Tara Lazar’s StoryStorm (then PiBoIdMo), I got the idea to look within myself and my experiences for book ideas. I knew I wanted to write an African American princess, and the story took many different shapes until I got to the final product.

Please share some of your writing process.
I write quickly and revise slowly. My process is a puzzle of scribbles and notes from notebooks, my phone, and bits of paper that I assemble once I finally have a pretty good idea of the direction I want to go with a story.
I don’t have a set schedule that I adhere to every day or week. I’m a work from home mom. That doesn’t work for my life. When I get moments to write, I take them, and I make sure that’s where my focus stays.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?
I’ve always been a writer. As a kid, I had a diary. When frustrated as a teen, I wrote poetry and kept a journal. It just took me a while to realize that I wanted to pursue writing professionally. That really didn’t hit me until I had my first child and was frequently at the library searching for books I wanted him to experience that weren’t problematic, out of touch, or not particularly meaningful to his already lived and likely upcoming experiences (in my opinion).

Where do you see your career headed? Do you have other WIPs or projects in the pipeline you would like to mention?
I don’t like to be boxed in, so I see myself writing widely—making something for the middle grade audience, dabbling with poetry…so many exciting possibilities

Please share your favourite kidlit books that have inspired you and served as mentor texts. Pick one classic and one contemporary book. What is it about them that moved you?
Clearly I turned to fairytales. (I know I’m cheating a little with that.) I also turned to Tammi Sauer’s MARY HAD A LITTLE GLAM. I like the idea of taking an old or familiar concept and making it something new.

What is the best (one) piece of advice you would give to other writers?
Well, self-care is important, and I think that’s something we writes tend to put on the back burner—whether that be out of choice or necessity. So, my advice would be this: Nourish yourself first for your ideas to flourish.

And a bonus Q- If you could be any flavour of ice cream, which one would you be and why?
Butter pecan—salty, sweet, a bit nutty. That’s me, lol.

BIO
Ashley Franklin is a writer, mother, and adjunct college professor. Ashley received her M.A. from the University of Delaware in English Literature, where she reaffirmed her love of writing but realized she had NO IDEA what she wanted to do about it.
Ashley currently resides in Arkansas with her family. Her debut picture book, NOT QUITE SNOW WHITE, was released July 9, 2019 by Harper Collins. For more information on Ashley and her writing journey, you can visit her website: www.ashleyfranklinwrites.com

 

Social media savvy?  You can find Ashley on one of these platforms:
Twitter:@differentashley
Facebook: Ashley Franklin
Instagram: @ashleyfranklinwrites

Q & A with author Emma Wunsch & GIVEAWAY!

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Hello world!

Welcome to my book blog. For this Q & A, please welcome the talented author Emma Wunsch who wrote the Miranda and Maude chapter book series published by Abrams Books. I’m a huge chapter book fan, and hers are unique. She explains her journey below.

But first, she’s doing a generous GIVEAWAY! Emma will gifting one lucky winner with Book 3 along with M&M stickers and bookmarks! To enter, please comment below on this blog and follow me on Twitter (@LydiaLukidis).

 

Can you describe the journey to publication for this book?
The journey for the Miranda and Maude series came from telling my then-princess-loving three-year-old daughter a story I made up about a princess named Miranda Rose. She loved the stories, but I quickly got bored and made up an “anti-princess” character named Maude. After years of telling Miranda and Maude stories to my two daughters, I decided to write them down. That three-year-old was ten (and long over princesses) when the first book came out last August.

Where did you draw the book’s inspiration?
The inspiration for the third book in the series RECESS REBELS came directly from hearing about the girl-boy dynamics in my daughters’ classroom. I thought that would a good starting place for the third book; the class gets along so well in BANANA PANTS (book 2), I wanted to shake things up.

Please share some of your writing process.
Whether it’s having a story due to my local writers group or going over a pass for my editor, I thrive with a deadline. When I’m on a deadline I’ll eek out whatever writing time I can find. When I’m not on a deadline, I can be less focused although I know I’m 65% happier when I’m writing. I tend to write fast and then take time to edit. For me, editing is where the real work begins. I love having something—even it’s a terrible first draft (and what first draft isn’t terrible?) and then working to make it better.

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?
I wrote my first story, in purple crayon, when I was six. I’ve always wanted to be a writer and I’ve written in a various forms/styles, for most of my life. But I’ve also had other jobs too. I currently work part-time in donor relations at a college. I’ve taught, worked in a bookstore, and badly waitressed.

Where do you see your career headed? Do you have other WIPs or projects in the pipeline you would like to mention?
Now that are (almost) three Miranda and Maude books, I’d like to do more in the schools. And yes, I have other books that I’m working on. I’d like to publish a MG one day and I have the germ of an idea for another chapter-book series, but it’s much too early to talk aboutJ!

Please share your favourite kidlit books that have inspired you and served as mentor texts. Pick one classic and one contemporary book. What is it about them that moved you?
As a kid, I couldn’t get enough Judy Blume. I read Superfudge so much I memorized the first three pages. The characters in Judy Blume’s books are relatable and extremely funny. I think (and so does my eleven-year-old) that Kate DiCamillo is a national treasure. We adore the books in the Raymie Nightingale trilogy. Her language is poetic, precise, and no one is better at naming characters.

What is the best (one) piece of advice you would give to other writers?
In my experience the world of publishing is so much out of my control that the only thing I feel I can completely control is the actual writing. If I don’t do that nothing else can happen.

And a bonus Q- If you could be any flavour of ice cream, which one would you be and why?
I’d be mint-chocolate chip because that was my favorite when I was a kid.

BIO
Emma Wunsch is the author of the YA The Movie Version and the chapter-book series Miranda and Maude. The third book in the series (Miranda and Maude: Recess Rebels) will be published in early September. Emma’s short fiction has been published in a variety of journals including: The Tishman Review, Passages North, The Best of the Bellevue Review, Lit, J Journal, and The Brooklyn Review. Her story “Looking for Cat Stevens” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2017.  Emma is currently working on a collection of short stories.

www.mirandaandmaude.com
Twitter :  @emmawunsch
FB: @emmawunschauthor

Books can be purchased anywhere, including here: https://www.norwichbookstore.com/emma-wunsch-recess-rebels-miranda-maude-3-signed-copies) (they have signed copies!)